Category Archives: Uncategorized

Book Review: Druidry and the Future

Reblogging with deep gratitude….

Wrycrow

druidryandfutureBrown, Nimue. Druidry and the Future. Independently published, 2019.

Nimue Brown of the Druid Life blog is one of the most prolific Druid writers out there, and her work is consistently thought-provoking and inspiring.

Druidry and the Future is intended, in Brown’s words “to be an antidote to despair”. It explores the ways that Druidry can help people respond to the many inter-related crises the world is facing today, from climate chaos to social upheaval and political uncertainty.

Covering a hugely diverse remit in a short book is a challenge, but Druidry and the Future does this admirably, never feeling like it is skimming over important issues and never getting too bogged down in dense detail.

This is not simply a book to read once and forget. As Brown writes, “this book is written to be a survival manual. It’s a handbook for turning Druidry into sustainable living, and…

View original post 249 more words


BOOK REVIEW: DRUIDRY AND THE FUTURE

A lovely review for Druidry and the Future. Many thanks to James for this…

James Nichol ran the contemplative druid group for some time and does a lot of fine blogging and is someone whose opinion I deeply respect, so being highly recommended by him is massively cheering to me.

contemplativeinquiry

Highly recommended. Druidry and the Future is intended as “antidote to despair” according to author Nimue Brown. She continues:

Druidry & Future 51hWUITk4HL._AC_UY218_ML3_

“This book explores the many ways in which the Druid path can help us to respond to climate chaos, necessary cultural change and political uncertainty. By mixing the spiritual and practical we can be more resilient and resourceful, and aspire to live in regenerative and generous ways.”

An affordably priced and relatively slender volume, Druidry and the Future is full of ideas. It is built around 16 essays covering diverse topics: working with Pagan stories: seasonal living: bardic powers; ‘pragmatic’ animism; working with the elements (three essays); de-colonising your soul; your body is nature; justice and balance; honouring the divine through action; putting ourselves back in the landscape; community solutions; self-care and kindness; trees and wetlands; regeneration and restoration. For me, there is a single overarching theme: enlisting the resources of…

View original post 141 more words


#MythpunkMonday: Hopeless Maine and The Power of Mythpunk

This is a very lovely reflection on one of my projects from a writer whose work and world building a very much love. Also, I thought many readers of this blog would enjoy the concept of mythpunk…

Blake And Wight . com

Merry #MythpunkMonday! Today I’m going to talk a bit about the power of myth and the importance of Mythpunk in relation to that, then look in depth at some Mythpunk which I think really exemplifies just what the genre is capable of.

So, yay! The second month of #MythpunkMonday  is happening! If you’d like to join in and share Mythpunk related marvellousness – your own or other people’s! – then just dive on in using the #MythpunkMonday hashtag or in the comments here, or on your local street corner, or whatever floats your pea green boat! 😉

Myths have been around as long as people have – from the moment we could communicate we started telling stories as a way of understanding our world, preserving and passing on knowledge and, dare I say it, entertaining eachother.

Joseph Campbell (for all his faults) tells us that mythology, particularly when rooted in…

View original post 1,407 more words


#MythpunkMonday: Table For The Dead

Well worth a read…

Blake And Wight . com

Happy #MythpunkMonday!

Thanks so much for journeying along with me so far, or if your new then very much welcome aboard!

A lot of my own stories centre around the strife and tension suffered by cultures who come seeking refuge, fleeing war and persecution, when the host country fails to welcome and respect them as human beings with established beliefs, values and ways of life.

These deserve to be valued wherever possible, just as those of the established culture are already, but so often they instead become embedded in a strange juxtaposition of both shame and ferocious pride.

When our beliefs, culture, language, skin colour, clothes and ways of being are treated as strange or unnatural by others (especially if they are outlawed, as in the case of the original Rromani refugees in Europe) those precious things which are innately ours can become a source of shame and we can…

View original post 429 more words


Grimworld – a review

My short take on this is that if, regardless of age, you like Tim Burton films, this book is for you.

Grimworld is a children’s book set in a strange and slightly creepy place. The world building is great with lots of details. I particularly appreciated that author Avery Moray does not explain why things are the way they are. This is how it is, and you see Grimworld through the eyes of a young person for whom it is totally normal to eat sugar slugs, and for whom having to talk to the worm lady is just one of those regular, unpleasant things. Kids who relish a bit of gruesomeness, will enjoy this greatly. It’s not one for the squeamish kids, or the ones who have nightmares at the slightest provocation.

The story is strong with plenty of peril and action. The writing is engaging, and there’s plenty of whimsy and humour in the mix. This is a book for young readers who are really into words and language. Emotionally it has some serious stuff going on around death and loss and squaring up to the prospect of your own death in a responsible sort of way. All of this was handled really well, but the emotive content might not be suitable for all young readers.

If you are the sort of adult who enjoys a saunter into books for younger humans, definitely check it out. It’s very readable, ideal for a quiet afternoon or two on the sofa. If you want something to read to your goth-child, it will work for you.

If there’s a Wednesday Adams in your life, or a Para-Norman, get this book for them.

More about the book here – https://www.johnhuntpublishing.com/ourstreet-books/our-books/grimworld 


#DreamtimeDamselsAnthology blog tour: Elevenses with Nimue Brown

A recent interview I did – more Steampunk flavoured than Pagan, and decidedly silly. Includes an octopus. As you do.

Blake And Wight . com

Good Morning Ladies and Gentlemen, welcome to Max and Collin’s rambunctiously raucous and chi-chi to the core parlour located high above it all on board our beautiful rainbow-sailed ship, The Harlequin Ladybird.

Our tentacles are all of a quiver this morning and our china cups are chattering because we are still taking part in the Dreamtime Damsels blog tour and we are honoured (and not even slightly alarmed) to have our very dear friend the infamous lunatic and cheese fiend Nimue Brown joining us for elevenses this morning.

Do please put down that lethal looking collection of cutlery, My Dear, and have a seat, (Max, get off the chaise and let her sit down before she takes off a tentacle with that spoon… hm? … no she can’t sit on your lap, just move aside.)

Would you like tea? Earl Grey? Lapsang? Assam? Darjeeling? Oolong? (Max that joke is wearing…

View original post 1,340 more words


Odin Edge

I’ve read this book, twice. Robin is a really interesting author and I can recommend following his blog. As soon as I know where to send people to buy copies, I will write a review. In the meantime…

Stroud Walking

img118.jpgimg119

Odin Edge is my first novel now in existence as of yesterday in book-form!

I wrote Odin Edge somewhere about two years ago, the final result of a few years continuously working on an Anglo-Saxon Viking novel set in the early 870’s AD in what was then in my part of England in Gloucestershire the kingdom of Mercia. That time was all about getting my mind into that world and time, trying to understand how Anglo-Saxon England worked and what the significant Viking incursions of the mid 800’s AD were like to live within as a person. Since then my knowledge of the Anglo-Saxon times has greatly evolved and flourished, and there is always much be to learnt. In Odin Edge I wanted to be in the skin of the ordinary population, the Anglo Saxon common man and woman, and to embark on a journey through their experience of having…

View original post 487 more words


“All religion is guesswork”

This made me very happy…

My Life Unfolds_

My little sister and her partner Jon came to stay during the week, together with my nephew, Caleb. (I say ‘little sister’- she’s 46 this year.)

Anyway, we were having a discussion around religion, spirituality and the like and she asked if I’d read a book called ‘Spirituality Without Structure: The Power of Finding Your Own Path’ by Nimue Brown, a practising Druid. I hadn’t, but later downloaded it to my Kindle and started reading.

View original post 847 more words


Book review: Hopeless, Maine: Victims by Tom and Nimue Brown

It makes me really happy when people think this much about something I have made. A great many hours go into creating any book, so it’s massively cheering to have this kind of feedback and to feel that it was time well spent…

Meredith Debonnaire

I promised to talk about something other than Tales From Tantamount, so here is my review of Hopeless, Maine: Victims. The latest dark delight from Tom and Nimue Brown. My reviews of the previous two books can be found here and here. Disclaimer: I do personally know these folks!

BEWARE SPOILERS! I have tried to keep this review free of spoilers for Victims, but it will definitely have spoilers for the previous two books.

Salamandra dramatically uses her magic powers to make tea

Welcome to my island.

My friends, my dears, my delightful squidlings, you need to read this series. Partly because it’s excellent, but partly because I desperately need to be able to talk about it with other people. Reading Victims is an exercise in realising just how much Tom and Nimue Brown snuck past me in the previous two books. There are all these amazing plot things happening and I’m there going…

View original post 443 more words


Review: Mapping the Contours by Nimue Brown

I love Lorna’s work, so her response to mine means a great deal to me…

From Peneverdant

mapping the contours by nimue brownThere’s something old about the poems in this book, a bone-deep knowing, a merging of self and land which is reflected in the cover image. It speaks of a time when the hills were the contours of giantesses, the curves of beautiful goddesses, a time that still is and is not with us now.

‘Walking myself into the landscape, and walking the landscape into myself’ is the way bard and druid author Nimue Brown describes the process behind her new poetry collection Mapping the Contours. In the poem that provides the title she says ‘Human bodies are much like landscapes.’

In ‘Raised upon these hills’, one of the most beautiful hymns to a landscape I have ever read, Nimue evokes her lifelong relationship with the Cotswold Edge:

I was raised upon these hills,
My bones are made of limestone,
Sweet Jurassic limestone,
Grown from ancient seas.
I was raised…

View original post 307 more words