Tag Archives: Meredith Debonnaire

Tales from Tantamount – a review

Tales from Tantamount started life on Meredith Debonnaire’s blog. It’s now available (with extras) as both an ebook and paperback.

Tantamount is a small, inherently unstable town somewhere in the vicinity of the Severn River. Where exactly it is, varies. History does not quite work the same way here either. History in Tantamount is a dangerous thing.

During The Year of The Sad Plastic Bag we get a glimpse of town life, most of it through found items, notices, and other ephemera. I like this kind of storytelling because it requires you, as a reader, to get in there and do a fair amount of the work, threading your own stories together from what’s available. There’s a lot of fun to be had here, because the fragments you get to play with are charming, evocative, provocative…

The whole project is laced with humour and satire, and things to think about, and weirdness and whimsy and unexpected voices. It’s a charming thing. If you like my fiction it’s highly likely you’ll also like what Merry does.

Start here if you want to read it on the blog – https://meredithdebonnaire.wordpress.com/tales-from-tantamount/

And yes, if the cover art seems somehow familiar, that would be because Tom drew it, and I did the colouring.

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Hopeless Maine Sinners – a review

Rather than me writing a book review this week, I thought I’d send you over to a review for my most recent graphic novel, Hopeless Maine – Sinners. It would be fair to say that this isn’t a review from a neutral and objective source.

Meredith is a contributor to The Hopeless Vendetta  she performed on stage with us last year when we were involved in Stroud Book Festival, she’s been a test player for the game and is going to more involved in Hopeless things in the future. She’s one of the people I write for.

There’s always a certain amount of urge to like a friend’s book, and to review it kindly. However, there’s also a different process, where we come to love people because we love their work. If you enter into a relationship with anyone else’s creativity, that will inform how you talk about what they do. To be neutral and objective is to be on the outside of a story, and maybe that’s not the best outcome.

You can read Meredith’s review here – https://meredithdebonnaire.wordpress.com/2018/07/12/book-review-hopeless-maine-sinners-by-tom-and-nimue-brown/