Ten not so green bottles

I admit that in the last month, due to a miscalculation about how much water to carry on a hot day, I ended up buying a bottle of water. It’s something I generally avoid. I have a reusable drink bottle that won’t leach plastics into my water, and I take it with me on warm days. It saves money, and of course it means I’m not disposing of as much plastic as I otherwise might.

According to a recent newspaper article, we get through a million bottles a minute, and much of it is people buying water. This worries me. It worries me in terms of the massive waste and recycling issue, but that’s not all.

It wasn’t so long ago that Nestle were telling us that access to water should not be a human right.

The more money there is in bottling water, the more pressure there will be to let water bottling companies make a profit. We’ve already seen this in action. It means depriving communities of drinking water. It means moving water bottles about by road rather than people sourcing their water more locally. It means taking something that is a common, is a necessity for life, and turning it into a commercial opportunity. It’s a logic that puts money ahead of life and planet.

Of course drinking water is considered healthy, and any kind of spring water or mineral water is marketed as extra healthy, so it’s easy to buy this stuff and feel virtuous. It would be better to demand safe, drinkable water on tap for everyone, at prices everyone can afford.

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About Nimue Brown

Druid, author, dreamer, folk enthusiast, parent, wife to the most amazing artist -Tom Brown. Drinker of coffee, maker of puddings. Exploring life as a Pagan, seeking good and meaningful ways to be, struggling with mental health issues and worried about many things. View all posts by Nimue Brown

6 responses to “Ten not so green bottles

  • John Davis

    Couldn’t agree more. We have a potential drinking water problem brewing up here in East Yorkshire. The fracking industry has licences to explore under an aquifer that supplies 95% of the drinking water to this part of the county. Just one well failure could poison the supply of tap water for who knows how long….the experience of this in the USA has not been heeded here! Just imagine how many plastic bottles would have to be brought in then to meet the demand for drinkable water. John /l\

  • garycohenblog

    While not the long term answer to the problem of plastic products polluting our world I wonder if putting a deposit on bottled goods would be helpful in the short term? However I guess this would mean an increase in transportation as the bottle is returned to be cleaned and reused.
    Apparently the payment on plastic bags has made a difference so I wonder if something similar could be done with bottles. Ultimately it’s best not to use them in the first place.

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